Pervenets (firstborn)

Pervenets (firstborn) was the first geyser found in Kamchatka. It happened in the spring of 1941, when Kronotskiy Reserve employees Tatyana Ustinova (geologist) and Anisifor Krupenin (inspector) were surveying Shumnaya river upstream region on dog sleds. Discovery of the Valley of Geysers started with Pervenets, hence the name.

Pervenets is located approximately 1km downstream from the main geyser platforms of the Valley, where Geyzernaya river flows into Shumnaya. Before the 2007 landslide it was one of the largest geysers of the Valley. Water erupted from it at approximately 45° angle shooting up to 20 meters high. Pauses between eruptions varied during the years between 45 minutes and 2 hours; sometimes it worked non-stop as a pulsating spring. Tourists visited Pervenets less frequently than other geysers in the Valley due to geyser's remote location.

This is how Tatyana Ustinova described eruption of Pervenets: "Pervenets' eruption starts abruptly. Water and steam column shoots up to 20 meters high with great force and noise. Eruption is reminiscent of a cannon shot. During the first two minutes jets are shooting up with strong but unstable force, weakening, then intensifying again. They are angled towards South—West at 45—50°. Steam is rising up as a continuous mass at least 150—200 meters high, making it's hard to see the water jets. Then water discharge stops completely and eruption continues with steam only. After that for a minute geyser slowly releases some steam" (T.I. Ustionva, "Geysers of Kamchatka", 1955).

2007 landslide seriously changed the Pervenets' appearance. Tip of the landslide partially obstructed the vent, but geyser continued to function for several days, until Geyzernaya river broke the dam. After that the river started to make a new course over the top of the landslide, carrying rocks and pebbles, which completely covered Pervenets, piling up to 6 meters. Geothermal activity, however, continued and soon a steaming crater formed over the top of the vent. In 2009 the crater above Pervenets was half washed away with water. And in 2011 Pervenets started to work as a geyser again with a 13-minutes cycle, although the height of its eruption is only 1 meter for now.


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  • Firstborn geyser
  • Firstborn geyser
  • Firstborn geyser
  • Firstborn geyser
  • Firstborn geyser
  • Firstborn geyser
  • Firstborn geyser